Mapping the Re:Mapping

July 13, 2011 § Leave a comment

Will this be the final post about our and ASA Collective’s adventures with Mapping and Re:Mapping Flâneurs?

The Newcastle Arts Centre exhibition ended on Saturday, and Wideyed took it down on Monday. Some lovely comments had been left on the blank index cards in the filing cabinet, for example:

A most delightful journey!

Great, but it feels like it needs to ‘grow’… The rolls need to keep unfurling.

The Flâneur, today this is me. Interesting to see what the rest of the world is up to, much sadness but some bright spots.

Inspiring use of technology, brilliant photography, very brave approach!

A fantastic concept concisely and attractively articulated through exhibition. Brings fantastic images from many countries into a cohesive, imaginative and thought provoking whole. Nice!

Someone even did a little drawing for us! But my personal favourite is “It’s awe-inspipiring – Oliver, age 10

Anyway, while the exhibition was up we filmed as well as photographed it, and we also shot some footage of the private view on 24th July, which we’ve finally got round to editing and posting here.

It really has been an adventure. Many thanks again to everyone who shared it with us.

Re:Mapping the Flâneur

May 19, 2011 § Leave a comment

Image © Srinigas Kuruganti

It’s now 6 weeks since FORMAT11 ended. It took a while for everyone at ASA Collective and Wideyed to get over Mapping the Flâneur (it was a lot of hard work!), and then start digesting the experience…

Over the month that Mapping the Flâneur took place, 97 photographers from 20 collectives around the world contributed just over 700 of their images to the installation project. 700 images in a month might not seem like a lot in a world where thousands of pictures are uploaded to online image sharing sites every minute. But when you’re processing 700 images, publishing them with credits and captions to a tumblr site and sending them to print in a gallery, all one by one, believe us, it’s a lot. And at the end of the exhibition, we discovered we’d used 5 rolls of 40m long paper, totalling 200m, for the installation. Those are big prints.

As part of the application process for ACE G4TA grants, there’s a section dedicated to evaluation – ACE ask how you plan to monitor the progress of your work from start to finish, and consider its potential impact beyond. When you first start considering this, the most obvious measurements of achievement are quantifiable things like the numbers of visitors to the exhibition, press clippings and web hits; for example, based on the figures supplied to us by FORMAT, we estimate that 2,500-2,700 people saw Mapping the Flâneur in Derby. After that, there are things like written comments and word-of-mouth feedback, evaluation forms and SWOT analyses…

But it also occurred to us that, at the close of the exhibition, a large number and variety of images would have been received, and the potential to successfully re-curate these into another object – another exhibition, say – would be the most interesting measure of the quality of the project.

And that’s exactly what we’re about to attempt.

This is the gallery in Newcastle where we’ll be re-exhibiting Mapping the Flâneur – or Re:Mapping the Flâneur. The gallery is part of Newcastle Arts Centre, which 100 years ago was a department store, and the arched ceiling is a restored original feature. Given that the piece of work we’ll be exhibiting there was directly inspired by Walter Benjamin’s ‘The Arcades Project’, the fact that we’ll be using a space that not only looks like an arcade but was also used as a commercial space like one, is fantastic.

And this is roughly how we plan to use that space. Although the gallery is large, it’s nowhere near big enough to display five 40m long prints, so we’ll exhibit the best parts of three, and with these try to give an impression of the lengths of the prints and the scale of the original project they were produced in. The index card filing cabinet we used in the Collectives Encounter exhibition will make a reappearance, and we’ll also produce a 13m long print, especially for this show, as a means of introducing some context (information about the Derby installation, the photographers that took part and their collectives, and so on).

In addition, our collaboration with ASA Collective continues, as we’re working to transform all the images we received into something that can be screened or projected. Our hope is that any of the other collectives involved in this project can then take ownership of this piece, by showing it themselves if they wish. That they might take it for a walk…

The exhibition will run from 14th – 26th June 2011 at Newcastle Arts Centre, 67 Westgate Road, NE1 1SG

6pm onwards on Friday 24th June, the projection piece being created for this exhibition will be screened at a special event, timed to coincide with Sunderland University’s ‘The Versatile Image: Photography in the Era of Web 2.0‘.

We hope to see you there!

Richard Glynn is an MAstar!

February 8, 2010 § Leave a comment

MAstars is an annual online selection of the most promising artists from the UK’s leading MA courses. Selected by influential artists, curators, academics and arts professionals, MAstars keeps you up to date with the artists to watch and gives you an insight into the future of the UK art scene.”

For more about Richard and other MAstars, follow this link.

‘Photography (w)here?’

January 26, 2010 § Leave a comment

North East Photography Network yesterday released the details of its first major event, ‘Photography (w)here?‘, a two day symposium and portfolio review.

Explore some of the pressing issues facing contemporary photographers and share some of your ideas with our panel of leading curators, editors and practitioners. What new opportunities exist for photographers? What are the pitfalls and how can we sustain our professional practices in the current economic climate? How are new photographic practices being supported and disseminated?

Symposium, Saturday 12th March: Photographer Sarah Pickering will be the key-note speaker. The round-table discussion will be chaired by Alessandro Vincentelli, Curator, Baltic.

Portfolio Reviews, Saturday 13th March: An exciting opportunity for one-to-one conversations with reviewers of your choice. Each review will last approximately 20 minutes, and booking is essential.

Reviewers:

  • Camilla Brown, Senior Curator, The Photographers’ Gallery, London
  • Malcolm Dickson, Director Street Level Photoworks, Glasgow
  • Patrick Henry, Director, Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool
  • Greg Hobson, Curator of Photographs, National Media Museum
  • Marc Prüst, Freelance Photography Consultant and Curator, Paris
  • Alistair Robinson, Programme Director, NGCA, Sunderland
  • and others TBC

Venue: The Mining Institute, Neville Hall, Westgate Road, Newcastle, NE1 1SE

Admission to the symposium is free, but booking in advance is essential.

Portfolio Reviews cost £5 per session. For more information, follow this link.

‘Sight Unseen’ opening

November 13, 2009 § Leave a comment

We were all too busy chatting and scoffing jelly babies last night, so by the time any of us remembered to take any shots of the preview the gallery was closing…

But this installation shot of Richard’s work couldn’t have been taken before the end (too many people in the way).

The man himself in situ.

Zhou Lucun’s installation.

And Zhou Lucun. His piece about employment prospects for the nearly 2.5 million students who graduate in China every year is really interesting.

Class of 2009 – from the left: Zhou Lucun, Siwan Liu (his work is amazing, but best seen in print), Yu Zhu (whose piece on homosexuality in China is interesting too), Patritsia Panayi and, of course, Richard Glynn. Congratulations everyone!

Invitation to ‘Sight Unseen’

November 9, 2009 § Leave a comment

First outing for Wideyed this month! Details of Richard Glynn’s MA show opening at NGCA below.

And for more info about Richard’s part of this exhibition, see ‘Lost Waltz’ in the “What we’ve done” section.


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